All posts by start

13 Cancer-Fighting Foods According to Science–#10 Kills Tumor Cells Without Damaging Healthy Ones

Illustration (Africa Studio, Photographee.eu/Shutterstock)

BY RUBY MEY

March 1, 2019 Updated: March 1, 2019

The link between food and cancer has been an inseparable part of oncological research since long ago.

In fact, an American Cancer Society (ACS) study on nutrition and physical activity confirms the well-known adage—you are what you eat. Subsequently, foods packed with anti-cancer properties can have a deep impact both as prevention and as treatment of cancer.

But, what is the right food? The abundance of information, some accurate and some erroneous, makes it hard to distinguish truth from shady endorsements. Before anyone makes drastic changes to their diets, it’s important to look into scientific research done in the field.… READ MORE...

‘Violins of Hope’ Share Their Secrets and Their Music

Israeli violin maker Amnon Weinstein restores a violin which he named the “Auschwitz Violin” since it belonged to a Jewish man imprisoned at the Auschwitz concentration camp during the Second World war at his workshop in Tel Aviv on July 15, 2016. (Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images)

BY MASHA SAVITZ

February 7, 2019 Updated: February 7, 2019

String instruments are exceptional pieces of artwork that seem to be forever imprinted by their past, and maybe even contain hints of their future.

It was said that the famous string instrument maker, Antonio Stradivarius, could perceive or intuit the sound quality that the wood of each tree would make while he walked among the trees in search of materials to make a violin, viola, or cello.… READ MORE...

Woman Lost 125 Pounds by Changing One Tiny Thing a Week: Small Steps To Transformation

Keely Dellit (Keely Dellit/Instagram)

BY RUBY MEY

February 7, 2019 Updated: February 7, 2019

If you feel like you’re always hearing about your friends or family members trying to lose weight, the reason might be because about half of American adults are trying to lose weight, according to a study.

After writing about the boiled egg diet, I tried it myself and lost 7 pounds in 7 days—which may not sound like a lot, but I was satisfied with the results as I reached my goal. However, for many people weight loss can be difficult, and some people would rather resort to surgical fat removal than starting diets and regular workouts.… READ MORE...

Rights Activists Urge Uzbekistan Not to Hand Ethnic Kazakh Over to China

People protest at a Uyghur rally in front of the U.S. Mission to the United Nations on Feb. 5, 2019 to encourage the State Department to fight for the freedom of the majority-Muslim Uyghur population unjustly imprisoned in Chinese concentration camps. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

BY REUTERS

February 8, 2019 Updated: February 8, 2019

ALMATY—Human rights activists are urging Uzbekistan to deny a Chinese extradition request for an ethnic Kazakh citizen of China who is now stuck in the Central Asian nation’s main air terminal.

Businessman Halemubieke Xiaheman, 41, from China’s Xinjiang Province, said in a video apparently recorded inside Tashkent airport building that he had been harassed by Chinese security officials to a point where his Russian and Kazakh clients were scared to work with him.… READ MORE...

Beethoven’s Music Has a Higher Purpose, His ‘Moonlight Sonata’ Never Gets Old

(Wikimedia | Joseph Karl Stieler)

BY CHRIS FORD

January 24, 2019 Updated: January 24, 2019

Ludwig van Beethoven was a German composer and pianist. He died in 1827, aged 56 years. Many say he was the greatest composer of all time.

Images | Rischgitz

Beethoven once stated: “Music from my fourth year began to be the first of my youthful occupations. Thus early acquainted with the gracious muse who tuned my soul to pure harmonies, I became fond of her, and, as it often seemed to me, she of me.”

At the tender age of 7, he gave his first public piano performance.… READ MORE...

‘The Tale of Genji,’ a 1,000-Year-Old Japanese Masterpiece

“Sekiya” (“At the Pass”), Ch. 16 of “The Tale of Genji,” circa 1130 A.D., by an artist of the imperial court of Kyoto. An illustrated handscroll.

Tokugawa Art Museum. (Public Domain)

Guide to the classics

BY THE CONVERSATION

January 24, 2019 Updated: January 24, 2019

Celebrating its millennial anniversary in 2008, “The Tale of Genji” (“Genji Monogatari”) is a masterpiece of Japanese literature. Completed in the early 11th century, Murasaki Shikibu’s elegant and enchanting prose spans 54 chapters, features some 400 characters, and contains almost 800 separate poems. Many consider it to be the world’s first novel, predating most European texts by several hundred years.… READ MORE...

New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer’s Over a Decade Before Symptoms Show, Scientists Say

(L) A nurse holding a test-tube with HIV positive blood in an infectious diseases hospital in Moscow. (Maxim Marmur/AFP/Getty Images) (R) An Alzheimer patient (C) is helped by relatives at their house in Yarumal, north of Antioquia department, Colombia on Dec. 3, 2014. (Raul Arboleda)

BY TOM OZIMEK

January 22, 2019 Updated: January 23, 2019

Researchers say a new test could potentially detect Alzheimer’s disease in patients many years before any symptoms arise, sidestepping complicated detection procedures with a simple blood test.

Scientists have long known that a certain protein marker is produced in the body as brain cells die. Current procedures to detect the biomarker involve tapping the spine to access cerebrospinal fluid, which is invasive and expensive.… READ MORE...

US Urges China to Release Jailed Human Rights Lawyer

Wang Quanzhang was detained in 2015 and sentenced on Jan. 28, 2019. (Photo from Wang’s family)

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

January 30, 2019 Updated: January 30, 2019

WASHINGTON—The Trump administration is calling on China to immediately release a jailed human rights lawyer who was convicted of subverting state power.

The State Department says in a statement it is deeply concerned by the 4½-year prison sentence handed down to Wang Quanzhang. It says he had been held for 3½ years in pre-trial detention, often incommunicado and deprived of a lawyer of his choice.

The department says it was troubled by his treatment and is urging Chinese authorities to reunite him with his family.… READ MORE...

What Is Hygge and Why Does Everyone Love It?

BY INTELLECTUAL TAKEOUT

January 13, 2019 Updated: January 13, 2019

During these last few holiday seasons in Britain and America, a strange new concept has become incredibly popular. Occupying the minds of many of my female friends and family members, this concept is known as “hygge” (pronounced hoo-ga). This word originates from the far-off, exotic land of Denmark and has no direct translation into English. The closest meaning is “to give comfort and joy.” It is the desire and feeling of coziness and hominess in everyday life.

To the Americans and Brits enamored with this fad, hygge signals comfy couches and mugs of hot cocoa.… READ MORE...

How to Eat and Cook Like the Ancient Greeks for a Healthier, Happier Life

Agape, or unconditional love, is the most important ingredient in the kitchen. (Shutterstock)

BY MARIA BENARDIS

January 16, 2019 Updated: January 16, 2019

The ancient Greek father of medicine, Hippocrates, penned that “all diseases begin in the gut,” and that for true healing and optimum health, we need to exercise, “let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food,” and understand that the “natural forces within us are the true healers of disease.”

The word “diet” comes from the ancient Greek “diaita,” which means “the way of life.” In ancient Greece, a diet was about good health, which required the nurturing of the mind, body, and soul.… READ MORE...